Dazzling creation

Photograph: Kenneth Libbrecht/Barcroft Media
Is each snowflake really unique? Says Hans Verlinde, associate professor of meteorology at Penn State:
“It depends upon how we define snowflake,” says Hans Verlinde, associate professor of meteorology at Penn State. “Let’s be specific, and define a snowflake as a single, vapor-grown ice crystal. I would say with a great deal of confidence that all crystals are different on a molecular level, purely because there are differences in the atomic structure of the atoms making up a water molecule, and hence, in the water molecules themselves.”

He further states… “But we can address the probability of finding two identical ice crystals, which is vanishingly small,” he notes. “The bigger the crystals get, the greater the freedom for different growth paths, and the lower the probability of finding identical crystals even at the macroscopic visual level.”

Enough about the science! The point is, God could have just made them look like formless blobs, but he didn’t! He is the original Master, and His Masterpieces are everywhere including you and me.

Last year I found a beautiful book at Barnes and Noble. On each page was a closeup of a different snowflake, about 200 in all. I just had to marvel again at the creativity of our Creator….nature speaks loudly for all who have the eyes to see and the ears to hear with….

“The heavens declare the glory of God; and the firmament sheweth his handywork. Day unto day uttereth speech, and night unto night sheweth knowledge. There is no speech or language, where their voice is not heard.” Psalm 1: 1-3

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